G Visa for Employees of International Organizations

December 16, 2013 Jamie Gilpin

g visaLooking to come to the U.S. by applying for a G visa? You’ll have to be a diplomat or other government official working as an employee of an international organization. First, a consular officer determines if you are eligible for an Employee of an International Organization (G) visa.  They must find your intended purpose of travel to be in pursuit of carrying out official duties.

If you meet the qualifications, there are certain classifications of the G visa on which you may enter the U.S.:

  • G-1 visa: You must be a permanent mission member of a recognized government to a designated international organization.
  • G-2 visa: You must be a representative of a recognized government traveling to the U.S. to temporarily attend meetings of a designated international organization.
  • G-3 visa: You must be a representative of a non-recognized or non-member government.
  • G-4 visa: You must be an individual who is proceeding to the U.S. to take up an appointment at a designated international organization (this includes the United Nations) to temporarily attend meetings of a designated international organization.
  • G-5 visa: You must be an attendant or servant of a G visa holder.

If you are a dependent or immediate family member of a G visa holder, you will generally take on the same classification as the primary visa applicant/holder.

When applying for a G-1 through G-4 visa abroad, U.S. embassies and consulates generally do not require an interview. That being said, a consular officer may request an interview at their discretion.

If you fall under the “official visa classification” umbrella (e.g. are eligible for an A, G, C-3, NATO visa) or hold a diplomatic passport, you are usually exempt from paying visa fees; however, this can also be up to the determination of a consular officer.

Necessary documentation you must provide for a G visa can include but not be limited to form DS-160 (and DS-1648, if applicable), a diplomatic note, a valid passport, a photograph, and, if an immediate family member, a copy of the visa and form I-94 of the principal visa holder.

Check out our article on the H visa.

Each week, we look at a different non-immigrant visa by letter, starting with “A” visas. Our intention is to not only help people understand the depth and complexity of U.S. immigration, but also to bring awareness to the enormously diverse pool of immigrants that enter our country every year.

The post G Visa for Employees of International Organizations appeared first on Envoy.

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