Canada: Permanent Residence Criteria Redefined for Select Foreign Nationals

August 8, 2022 Jessie Butchley

Key Points 

  • Canada will no longer require eligible applicants applying for permanent residence under the Rural and Northern Immigration Pilot program to complete one year of continuous work experience 

Overview  

The government of Canada introduced exemptions for work experience requirements for foreign nationals applying for permanent residence under the Rural and Northern Immigration Pilot program (RNIP). Applicants under these programs will now be exempt from the requirement to accumulate one year (at least 1,560 hours) of work experience over a continuous period. Instead, any work experience (whether completed remotely or part-time) over the past three years will count towards the one year of needed work experience, regardless of whether this work was continuous or spaced out over the three-year period.  

The work experience exemption will apply to any work interruptions in the last three years prior to the applicant submitting their permanent residence application. The interruption does not need to be COVID-19 related.  

What are the Changes?  

The government of Canada will no longer require eligible applicants who apply for permanent residence under the RNIP to complete one year of continuous work experience. Instead, the government will accept any work experience completed within the last three years that accumulates to a total period of one year. Applicants must continue to meet all other requirements under the RNIP.   

Looking Ahead  

Continue to check the government of Canada’s website and Envoy’s website for the latest updates and information.  


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Content in this publication is for informational purposes only and not intended as legal advice, nor should it be relied on as such. For additional information on the issues discussed, consult an attorney at one of the two U.S. Law Firms working with the Envoy Platform or another qualified professional. On non-U.S. immigration issues, consult an Envoy global immigration service provider or another qualified representative.

About the Author

Jessie is Envoy's Global Immigration Writer.

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